Trump courts union work­ers as oth­er Repub­li­can can­di­dates keep their dis­tance

For­mer Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump and oth­er 2024 Repub­li­can pres­i­den­tial can­di­dates are tak­ing dif­fer­ent approach­es to labor unions dur­ing a major strike, with the field most­ly uni­fied in attribut­ing blame to Pres­i­dent Joe Biden’s eco­nom­ic and ener­gy poli­cies.
Last week, the Unit­ed Auto Work­ers began a tar­get­ed strike with 13,000 mem­bers of the Big Three automak­ers Gen­er­al Motors, Ford, and Stel­lan­tis in Michi­gan, Mis­souri, and Ohio.
UAW STRIKE: SHAWN FAIN GIVES NEW DEADLINE BEFORE MORE UNION WORKERS WALK OUT ON JOBS
Trump is using the strike as an oppor­tu­ni­ty to court autowork­ers in the Mid­west, plac­ing blame on the Biden admin­is­tra­tion for the cur­rent ordeal. On Sept. 27, the for­mer pres­i­dent will report­ed­ly skip the sec­ond Repub­li­can debate in favor of speak­ing to cur­rent and for­mer UAW mem­bers in Detroit, Michi­gan.
Ahead of the strike, Trump claimed in a state­ment, “No pres­i­dent has ever fought hard­er for autowork­ers than Pres­i­dent Trump. Time after time, I res­cued the U.S. auto indus­try from cer­tain destruc­tion: With­draw­ing from TPP, over­haul­ing the Korea deal to restore the pro­tec­tive tar­iff on pick­up trucks, canc …