Law­mak­ers com­pete for FBI spy tool reforms while bill remains in lim­bo

A crit­i­cal tool the intel­li­gence com­mu­ni­ty uses to gath­er infor­ma­tion on for­eign­ers expires in one month and Con­gress is set to reau­tho­rize it, but the FBI’s past mis­use of one of its most pow­er­ful assets has put law­mak­ers at odds ahead of the loom­ing dead­line.
Sev­er­al con­gres­sion­al com­mit­tees and a num­ber of unex­pect­ed bipar­ti­san alliances have craft­ed com­pet­ing pro­pos­als that would renew the con­tro­ver­sial tool, found under Sec­tion 702 of the For­eign Intel­li­gence Sur­veil­lance Act.
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“There have been far too many abus­es over the last five years and before that, and so we must reform it and put in revi­sions. … I think the prod­uct that the Intel­li­gence Com­mit­tee on the House side has come up with has done exact­ly that,” Rep. Darin LaHood (R‑IL) said Tues­day evening at a dis­cus­sion at the Coun­cil on For­eign Rela­tions.

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Sec­tion 702 allows the FBI …